Primeur magazine

Edition: flash - Issue: 2017-03-16

Applications

On an EPCC blog, Adrian Jackson explains how making sure threads and processes are correctly placed, or bound, on cores or processors is essential to ensure good performance for a range of parallel applications. He is illustrating OpenMP and MPI cases and uses for instance the Archer supercomputer as an example. Read further...

Industry news

On the SUSE blog it was announced that the High-Performance Computing Module (HPC Module) for SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLES) is now available for 64-bit ARM (AArch64) systems. "We are still quite early in the history of the SLES HPC Module. Now that we have completed the initial mechanics of delivering the HPC Module for both X86-64 and 64-bit ARM architectures, we expect to be able to deliver additional packages and updated packages more rapidly than. was previously possible", writes Jay Kruemcke on the blog. Read further...

Exascale

Paul Messina explains in the Huffington Post why we need Exascale supercomputing. His applications: Reducing Pollution; Advances in Materials Science; New Energy Solutions; Advances in Healthcare; Predicting Severe Weather; and Improving Quality of Life. In addition he writes: "any planned uses of exascale computing address fundamental scientific questions in fields such as high-energy physics and chemistry. " Read further...
On his blog European Commissioner Andrus Ansip explains why Europe needs Exascale supercomputing. Applications areas that will benifit are, according to Ansip, new medical treatments and their effects; oil and gas exploration; seismic simulation or improved climate modelling; designing energy-efficient buildings. Aircraft and car deasign are other examples. Next week the European Commission and European countries will announce their official exascale plans in Rome. Read further...
"The U.S. should not underestimate the capability or potential of Chinese supercomputing initiatives", said Addison Snell, Intersect360 Research in his testimony for the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission of the United States Congress, earlier today. Snell thinks the Chinese have a substantial edge right now at the zenith of the supercomputing market, and a funded plan to drive to Exascale supercomputing. There is a good chance that China will deploy an Exascale supercomputer by the end of 2019. Japan previously had an Exascale plan on a similar timeframe, but recent delays mean Japan likely won't achieve Exascale until 2020 or 2021 (likely to be built by Fujitsu), said Snell. Read further...