Primeur magazine

Edition: flash - Issue: 2016-03-30

Hardware

The report of a Roundtable Convened to Consider Neuromorphic Computing Basic Research Needs at the Neuromorphic Computing: From Materials to Systems Architecture in Gaithersburg, October 2015, has been published. The basic question was: "Can brain-like (neuromorphic) computing devices based on new material concepts and systems be developed to dramatically outperform conventional CMOS based technology? If so, what are the basic research challenges for materials science and computing?" Read further...

Applications

Jeff Squyres, CISCO representative to the MPI Forum standards body, is interviewed on the OPENHPC website. He recaps some lessons learned from Open MPI: "From our experience (Open MPI as a project is over 10 years old!), a successful community project needs to exhibit multiple characteristics: Actually be open. Don't just throw code over the wall every once in a while. Encourage the community - not just vendors - to participate and innovate. Even those who are not paid a salary to develop HPC stacks can have great ideas. Encourage vendors to participate and innovate. There must be possibilities for vendor value-add and differentiation. Don't let any one organization - vendor or otherwise - drive the community. Working together as a community is hard. Sometimes it's really hard. But I am a huge believer that community-driven projects, when properly nurtured and encouraged, can result in significantly better results than are possible by any individual organization." Read further...
On the NVIDIA blog it is explained how researchers at Imperial College London are deploying sophisticated image analysis tools, powered by GPUs and deep learning, to help diagnose damage to our most complex organ, the brain. The blog reports that computational methods are at the core of work by a team led by Ben Glocker, a lecturer at Imperial's computing department. Taking advantage of the rich data in biomedical scans, their system provides automated, image-based assessments of traumatic brain injuries at speeds other systems can't match. The work has placed Glocker and his team among five finalists for NVIDIA's 2016 Global Impact Award. The annual grant of $150,000 is given to researchers using NVIDIA technology for groundbreaking work that addresses social, humanitarian and environmental problems. Read further...
Tweakers.net provides an overview of the supercomputers at SURFsara which today is the Dutch national supercomputing centre. The overview starts in 1984 with a Cyber 2015 running at 100 Mflop/s. The current system is a Bull supercomputer called Cartesius with a peak performance of 1,5 Petaflop/s. There will be more upgrades. Atos/Bull HPC-specialist Meiland is even a bit over-optimistic expecting an exascale system in Amsterdam in 2020. Read further...