Primeur magazine

Edition: flash - Issue: 2015-10-02

Hardware

Seymour Cray would have been 90 years old this week. The Register is publishing a nice article about him, comparing him with Steve Jobs. The Register notes that remarkably, and despite the price, a Cray-1 costed USD 8,8 million - it was Cray's computers which dominated high-performance computing (HPC) for 30 years, seeing off even the mighty IBM. Buying a Cray became like buying IBM elsewhere: it wouldn't get you fired. Read further...

Applications

Makeda Easter reports about simulating Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). AAA is a vascular disease that affects tens of thousands of people around the world each year. The disease occurs most commonly in men over 60, and is characterized by a dilation of the abdominal aortic wall and often a persistent blood clot. The Continuum Biomechanics Lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Yale University is using computational models in combination with biological experiments, so researchers in the lab can study AAA development at both the micro and macro scales. To explore the fluid dynamics of blood flows, the researchers rely on a mix of computational resources from Yale and the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is funded by the National Science Foundation. Read further...
Chapel is parallel programming language under development by Cray. Version 1.12.0 of Chapel was released on October 1, 2015. Read further...
Cellular membranes regulate the exchanges between inside and outside the cell, and therefore play an essential role in numerous biological processes, but they are very difficult to approach experimentally. The use of numerical simulation, in particular of molecular dynamic simulations, allows scientists to progressively uncover the mystery. This is what Luca Monticelli, researcher at Inserm, and his team have achieved when studying the impact of various pollutants on model membranes. Model membranes are simpler than real cellular membranes but still capable of reproducing many aspects of their real functioning. in 2015, the simulations ran on GENCI’s Occigen supercomputer, with an allocation of 2.7 million core hours. Read further...